In Europe/ Like a Local

THE 5 NARROWEST STREETS IN EUROPE REVEALED (AND THEY’RE TOTALLY TINY)

the Top 5 Narrowest Streets in Europe!
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Tiny, small and often little more than a gap between two much larger buildings, you often have to ask yourself ‘What is even the point of this passageway?’! After all, the narrowest streets in Europe are the kind of alleyways you could easily miss if you didn’t know where to look. Here are the five narrowest streets in Europe. (The kind of little lanes that even the locals don’t know about!)

Strada Sforii (“Rope Street”), Brasov, Romania. (44 inches wide at its narrowest point)

When I first made my plans to visit Brasov, a friend advised me to ‘go in search of the narrowest street in Eastern Europe’. And after a whole load of wandering around the city, I finally came across Strada Sforii. This narrow little lane is tiny, easy to miss. Wandering down the tiny alleyway, you can also admire the Hollywood-style ‘Brasov’ sign towering above the city on Tampa Mountain.

Read more: Brasov, a beautiful city in the very heart of Transylvania.

narrowest streets in europe: Best things to do in Brasov, Romania: a quick guide on what to see and where to go in this Transylvanian city!

Mårten Trotzigs Gränd, Stockholm Sweden. (35 inches wide at its narrowest point)

The thin street of Mårten Trotzigs Gränd in Sweden is located in the old town of Stockholm, capital of Sweden. The alleyway, which also happens to be the narrowest street in Sweden, was named after the 16th-17th-century merchant, Mårten Trotzig. When he moved to Stockholm in 1581, the wealthy businessman bought up many of the properties along the street and even opened a store there.

Parliament Street, Exeter, Devon, England. (25 inches wide at its narrowest point)

Located in a gap between the buildings housing Patisserie Valerie and Greggs, in the very middle of Exeter’s busy high street, you’ll find Parliament street. Once thought by many (although evidently wrongly) to be the narrowest street in the world, it still remains the narrowest street in the United Kingdom. Constructed as early as the 14th century, during the 18th century the street was regularly used by locals to dump their chamber pots (toilet waste for those fortunate enough to have never heard of a chamber pot!)

Read more: A Harry Potter Guide to Exeter, inspiration for Harry Potter.

Walking down parliament street in Exeter, Devon, England: thought by many to be the narrowest street in the world

Calle Varisco, Venice, Italy. (20 inches at its narrowest point)

As the narrowest street in Venice, if not all of Italy, Calle Varisco (also known as Ramo Varisco) ironically has some very tall tales to tell. According to legend, if a murderer walks down this narrow and dead-end street (the street leads only to another canal and is not a through passage), then they’ll be instantly crushed by the close together walls.

Spreuerhofstraße, Reutlingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. (12.2 inches wide at its narrowest point)

In Germany, you’ll find not only the narrowest street in Europe but what is thought by many (including the Guinness Book of World Records) to be the narrowest street in the entire world! Measuring a staggeringly small 12.2 inches wide at its narrowest point, this little street is located between two homes. The little lane was constructed in 1727 after a huge fire destroyed much of the city in 1726.

narrowest streets in europe: narrowest street in the world

Image via Wikicommons

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The 5 Narrowest Streets in Europe revealed: here are the five smallest streets in Europe: and they're in Italy, Germany, the UK, Romania and Sweden!

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2 Comments

  • Reply
    California Globetrotter
    15th December 2017 at 8:17 am

    What a unique post! I need to make it to Reutlingen while I still can!

  • Reply
    Tanja (the Red phone box travels)
    10th December 2017 at 9:37 am

    I’ve been to the one in Stockholm:))

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